Apr 23, 2014
Photograph by Charles Eames of Shirley Yamaguchi at the Eames’ House, on the occasion of a tea ceremony hosted by Isamu Noguchi for Charlie Chaplin, 1951.
Two of Noguchi’s Akari are in the background. 
The Noguchi Museum Archive

Photograph by Charles Eames of Shirley Yamaguchi at the Eames’ House, on the occasion of a tea ceremony hosted by Isamu Noguchi for Charlie Chaplin, 1951.

Two of Noguchi’s Akari are in the background. 

The Noguchi Museum Archive

Apr 23, 2014
A morning spent rigging Isamu Noguchi’s Beginnings, a five- piece variable installation sculpture…. No two installations alike!
Photo by our Collections Manager Larry Giacoletti

A morning spent rigging Isamu Noguchi’s Beginnings, a five- piece variable installation sculpture…. No two installations alike!

Photo by our Collections Manager Larry Giacoletti

Apr 22, 2014

publicartfund:

Happy Earth Day! In honor of the annual event, we look back at Eric Arctander’s Nieuw Amsterdam ShorelineIn 1980, the environmental artist recreated the original shoreline of Manhattan, prior to landfill, across and along present-day streets and sidewalks.

The mile and a half of vivid green and blue—colors chosen to evoke land and water and to avoid confusion with highway markings in the area—began at Wall Street, New Amsterdam’s northern boundary, and extended southwest along Pearl Street to Broad Street. The two parallel lines—each four inches wide with a four-inch gap between— extended up and down Broad Street to a point just north of Beaver Street, designating the man-made canal, called “Heere Gracht” after Amsterdam’s famed waterway, which remained a landfill until 1673. Read more. 

Apr 22, 2014
sculpture-center:

Happy Earth Day from SculptureCenter!
Anya Gallaccio, one art, SculptureCenter, 2006. Weeping cherry tree, bolts, aircraft cable. Courtesy SculptureCenter and the artist. Photo: Jason Mandella
https://sculpture-center.org/

sculpture-center:

Happy Earth Day from SculptureCenter!

Anya Gallaccio, one art, SculptureCenter, 2006. Weeping cherry tree, bolts, aircraft cable. Courtesy SculptureCenter and the artist. Photo: Jason Mandella

https://sculpture-center.org/

Apr 22, 2014

It’s a big day here at The Noguchi Museum: the day the tents are removed from the basalts and granites in the garden and The Well is moved back to its spot.  This week might be a nice time to visit, no?

Isamu Noguchi, Behind Inner Seeking Shiva Dancing, 1976- 82, basalt

Photos by our Collections Manager Larry Giacoletti

Apr 21, 2014
Isamu Noguchi, Okame (Atomic Head), 1954, iron
Photograph by Kevin Noble
The Noguchi Museum

Isamu Noguchi, Okame (Atomic Head), 1954, iron

Photograph by Kevin Noble

The Noguchi Museum

Apr 21, 2014
Isamu Noguchi, Woman, 1954, iron, in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York
Photograph by Rudolph Burckhardt
Print from The Noguchi Museum Archive

Isamu Noguchi, Woman, 1954, iron, in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Photograph by Rudolph Burckhardt

Print from The Noguchi Museum Archive

Apr 18, 2014

(Source: redcharming)

Apr 18, 2014
rerun
thenoguchimuseum:

Photograph taken by Isamu Noguchi during his visit to Buckminster Fuller’s Biosphere at Expo ‘67 in Montreal
The Noguchi Museum Archive. 

rerun

thenoguchimuseum:

Photograph taken by Isamu Noguchi during his visit to Buckminster Fuller’s Biosphere at Expo ‘67 in Montreal

The Noguchi Museum Archive. 

Apr 18, 2014
rudygodinez:

Buckminster Fuller, United States Pavilion, (1967)
Probably the best known geodesic structure is the United States Pavilion in Montreal, Canada, designed for expo 1967. This 250 foot diameter, diaphanous, silvery sphere caught the imagination of all who visited the expo and became the symbolic icon of all subsequent world’s fairs and of visionary urban construction. Every expo after 1967 had it’s spherical exhibition structure; every city of the future had it’s spherical building prominently positioned in it’s urban fabric.

rudygodinez:

Buckminster Fuller, United States Pavilion, (1967)

Probably the best known geodesic structure is the United States Pavilion in Montreal, Canada, designed for expo 1967. This 250 foot diameter, diaphanous, silvery sphere caught the imagination of all who visited the expo and became the symbolic icon of all subsequent world’s fairs and of visionary urban construction. Every expo after 1967 had it’s spherical exhibition structure; every city of the future had it’s spherical building prominently positioned in it’s urban fabric.

(via catherinewillis)

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